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Author Topic: Developing Games  (Read 138 times)
Offline (Male) hpg678
Posted on: September 18, 2017, 09:27:14 AM

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I'm interested in knowing which platform developers such as yourself cater to. Is it Windows, Linux, IOS or probably something else?
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Hugar
Offline (Male) HitCoder
Reply #1 Posted on: September 18, 2017, 04:26:55 PM

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Always been a fan of the Linux operating system. Been using it since 2013, because 13 year old me was very interested in things like it. I have wanted to make my own distro but... never have managed to get all that far.

Regardless, I've always seen Windows as a priority platform for compiling applications and games, due to the fact it seems to be the most mainstream, especially for games. This is because it comes pre-installed on computers and laptops alike, much more so than linux. These devices are far more expensive than Apple devices.

I do prefer Linux to Windows (but keep running into issues with hardware compatibility which pushes me back to Windows far too much).

But, while you have included iOS, I think you should also have considered the fact Mac OS is its own thing (or maybe not, I've heard that iOS and Mac OS are the same OS, but they detect their hardware and change interface to match correctly. Don't quote me on this though, since I would never buy an Apple product as I cannot justify one for my own personal needs.

But overall, I would usually try to develop for Windows and Linux, which is why I like Enigma. I can make games that run on both of these platforms so long as I have an install of both, (though, again, my linux installs keep breaking due to random issues which have mainly been hardware).

I wouldn't really develop for a mobile platform, simply because I'm really too lazy to bother trying to compile for those platforms.
And while I do like the whole cross-platform thing very much, Java is one programming language that I'm going to avoid as much as possible, since it hurts me at how slow it is. So again, Enigma is my preferred compiler. Not a huge fan of the IDE (LateralGM) since it runs in Java, but I should appreciate that it works on windows and Linux. That being said, it actually functions very smoothly considering that it is in Java.

Sorry for rambling, I hope I helped provide any extra data you were looking for :)
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DISCORD: HitCoder#4530
I'm not good at games, and I'm not good at making them either. But I am fairly confident I am a decent programmer. I think. Maybe not.
(As you can tell I am not witty at all)
Offline (Male) time-killer-games
Reply #2 Posted on: September 18, 2017, 08:55:30 PM

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Just as a standard, for desktops I like to make sure I always support Windows, Mac, and Linux.

I wish I could (just for fun) make games for Solaris, ChromeOS, BSD, etc. but there aren't that many tools available to make games for those platforms, probably because of the lack of demand.

As for mobile, iOS and Android are all I care about. Tizen is dead and Windows Phone is dying.

tl;dr Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, and Android.
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Offline (Male) Goombert
Reply #3 Posted on: September 19, 2017, 02:26:12 PM

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For me, it's honestly Windows and HTML5. It makes sense why YoYoGames focused on those platforms first because it's where everybody is mostly at. That may someday change, but until then it's only practical. I love open source and Linux too, it's really great at a lot of things, but Windows has its clear advantages.

If there wasn't something like GameMaker, I would honestly probably just write HTML5 games manually without any toolkit. Heck they run everywhere and I am skilled enough to produce most of the games I would be interested in making, the desktop provides nothing special. JavaScript is also dynamically typed with many features similar, and better in some cases, to GML.
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Offline (Male) hpg678
Reply #4 Posted on: September 20, 2017, 10:48:43 AM

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Like many users, I grew up in the Windows world. I was always interested in pulling things apart and putting it back together and that is what got me in Computer repairs. Back then there was the Commodore, Amiga, Apple II and so on.

there is no denying that LINUX is more stable WINDOWS and is probably more stable than any other operating system out there.  As far as user experience in general is concerned, that is where it lacks as well is misunderstood. by this I mean, because of the many misconceptions around using LINUX, a lot of potential users run towards Windows and a lot developers cater then to that platform.

I mean let's be honest. All of us wants to make money as a developer whether you create software or games for what platform you cater to. It's perhaps the most successful way to make money, short of getting involved in religion :) , but that's another thing altogether.

However, I think that it's quite dangerous to keep flooding the Windows market. Eventually it is going crash and burn and users are going to look for another platform. Which is where developing for LINUX can be the next money making platform as well as rewarding.

I have two computers on my network, one with Windows 7 and the other has LINUX. When I test a project, I have found that the one running on LINUX perform much better in terms of speed, execution and the graphics run smoother. Of course I am using ENIGMA on both computers. I want to deliver this type of experience to the users of my game/software. that is not to say that all Windows games don't give you that, but I watched videos where this type of thing do happen a lot.

Lastly I want to just say, and this just my opinion by the way, game development is hard, very hard. It's like its within a box where there's a set of rules and directions that is for you to follow. let's take two games for example, Candy Crush and Bejeweled. Both have the same concept, match-3 or more objects, yet one is more successful. Now let's look at another example.... Flappy Bird. Compared to the two previous ones that had many lines of code, Flappy bird had less than 50 and the owner became a millionaire.

The point to this is the author didn't follow the norm with a big story plot, lot of levels and so forth, he achieved all of that with one level and that was it. WE need to think/do things out of box and not be too constrained within the norm.

Just my opinion.




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Hugar
Offline (Male) Goombert
Reply #5 Posted on: September 20, 2017, 12:59:49 PM

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Quote from: HitCoder
I've heard that iOS and Mac OS are the same OS
They are in the same sense that Ubuntu and Arch are the same OS. They use the same kernel (which is what Linux is) that is based on Mach which was itself developed at Carnegie Mellon University.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mach_(kernel%29

Quote from: hpg678
most successful way to make money
Yes, basically what I was trying to convey.

I am getting sick of using these abominations of shells though like cygwin, msys, git bash for windows, command prompt, and powershell are all terrible. This is one of the biggest pains of developing on and for Windows. It's part of the reason why Linux people have so much better success installing ENIGMA.

Take this issue I had to fix earlier while writing a Python server script:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/32597209/python-not-working-in-the-command-line-of-git-bash

Quote from: hpg678
flooding the Windows market
You know, that's an interesting perspective, I never would have considered the over-saturation of software on Windows to be a potentially bad thing, but you may be right.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 01:15:06 PM by Goombert » Logged
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